Home Menu
Channel
Play

Home   >   Textbooks   >   Basic Electronics   >   DC Circuits   >   Series DC Circuits   >  


DC Circuits

Series DC Circuits

A series circuit is defined as a circuit that contains only one path for current flow. To compare the basic circuit and a more complex series circuit, figure below shows two circuits. The basic circuit has only one lamp and the series circuit has three lamps connected in series.

Comparison of basic and series circuits
Comparison of basic and series circuits.

Resistance in a Series Circuit

Referring to figure above, the current in a series circuit must flow through each lamp to complete the electrical path in the circuit. Each additional lamp offers added resistance. In a series circuit, the total circuit resistance Rt is equal to the sum of the individual resistances.

As an equation:

Series resistance

Note: The subscript n denotes any number of additional resistances that might be in the equation.

Example: In figure below a series circuit consisting of three resistors: one of 10 Ω, one of 15 Ω, and one of 30 Ω, is shown. A voltage source provides 110 V. What is the total resistance?

Solving for total resistance in a series circuit
Solving for total resistance in a series circuit.

Given:
R1 = 10 Ω, R2 = 15 Ω, R3 = 30 Ω

Solution:

Series resistance example

In some circuit applications, the total resistance is known and the value of one of the circuit resistors has to be determined. The equation Rt = R1 + R2 + R3 can be transposed to solve for the value of the unknown resistance.

Example: In figure below the total resistance of a circuit containing three resistors is 40 Ω. Two of the circuit resistors are 10 Ω each. Calculate the value of the third resistor (R3).

Calculating the value of one resistance in a series circuit
Calculating the value of one resistance in a series circuit.

Given:
Rt = 40 Ω, R1 = 10 Ω, R2 = 10 Ω, R3 = ?

Solution:

Series resistance 2

Subtracting (R1 + R2) from both sides of the equation

Series resistance example 2

Current in a Series Circuit

Since there is only one path for current in a series circuit, the same current must flow through each component of the circuit. To determine the current in a series circuit, only the current through one of the components need be known.

The fact that the same current flows through each component of a series circuit can be verified by inserting meters into the circuit at various points, as shown in figure below. If this were done, each meter would be found to indicate the same value of current.

Current in a series circuit
Current in a series circuit.

Voltage in a Series Circuit

The voltage dropped across the resistor in a circuit consisting of a single resistor and a voltage source is the total voltage across the circuit and is equal to the applied voltage. The total voltage across a series circuit that consists of more than one resistor is also equal to the applied voltage, but consists of the sum of the individual resistor voltage drops. In any series circuit, the sum of the resistor voltage drops must equal the source voltage. This statement can be proven by an examination of the circuit shown in figure below.

Calculating individual voltage drops in a series circuit
Calculating individual voltage drops in a series circuit.

In this circuit a source potential (Vt) of 20 V is dropped across a series circuit consisting of two 5-ohm resistors. The total resistance of the circuit (Rt) is equal to the sum of the two individual resistances, or 10 Ω. Using Ohm’s law the circuit current may be calculated as follows:

Given: Vt = 20 V, Rt = 10 Ω
Solution:

Series current

Since the value of the resistors is known to be 5 Ω each, and the current through the resistors is known to be 2 A, the voltage drops across the resistors can be calculated. The voltage (V1) across R1 is therefore:

Given: I1 = 2 A, R1 = 5 Ω
Solution:

Series voltage

By inspecting the circuit, you can see that R2 is the same ohmic value as R1 and carries the same current. The voltage drop across R2 is therefore also equal to 10 V. Adding these two 10-volts drops together gives a total drop of 20 V, exactly equal to the applied voltage. For a series circuit then:

Series voltages

Example: A series circuit consists of three resistors having values of 20 Ω, 30 Ω, and 50 Ω, respectively. Find the applied voltage if the current through the 30 Ω resistor is 2 A.

To solve the problem, a circuit diagram is first drawn and labeled (figure below).

Solving for applied voltage in a series circuit
Solving for applied voltage in a series circuit.

Given: R1 = 20 Ω, R2 = 30 Ω, R3 = 50 Ω, I = 2 A

Solution: Since the circuit involved is a series circuit, the same 2 A of current flows through each resistor. Using Ohm's law, the voltage drops across each of the three resistors can be calculated and are:

Series voltage example

Once the individual drops are known they can be added to find the total or applied voltage:

Series voltages example

Note: When you use Ohm’s law, the quantities for the equation must be taken from the same part of the circuit. In the above example the voltage across R2 was computed using the current through R2 and the resistance of R2.

The value of the voltage dropped by a resistor is determined by the applied voltage and is in proportion to the circuit resistances. The voltage drops that occur in a series circuit are in direct proportion to the resistances. This is the result of having the same current flow through each resistor—the larger the ohmic value of the resistor, the larger the voltage drop across it.



Contents